A regional manager’s blurry edges

Jo leading in-house training
Jo leading in-house training

Some of you will know our Regional Manager, Jo Stainsby, because she was the first manager at Wellingborough Day Nursery. Nowadays she supports Hayley and the team behind the scenes and although she is happy enough to be an unsung hero, I thought that it might be nice to turn her into a sung hero for once.

Jo’s role is broad and a little fuzzy around the edges.

At the heart of her job description is something about rolling out new legislation (of which there is a lot in this industry) and checking that nursery complies with all the regulations dished out by the government, the council, Ofsted, Health and Safety, Environmental Health, the Fire Service, COSHH, the National Day Nurseries’ Association and two demanding directors (of which I’m one.)

Alongside this, her job spec requires her to support Hayley and the other managers at our sister nurseries in whatever ways are necessary to ensure standards remain outstanding. On a bad day, this might mean wielding the sink plunger to remove paper towels from the Crocodiles’ toilets. Or holding a tissue under the nose of a child who has inhaled a pea, whilst demonstrating the delicate art of blowing out of one’s nostrils with some force.

Jo and the management team at Wellingborough Day Nursery
Jo and the management team at Wellingborough Day Nursery

On a good day, you will find Jo leading some in-house training, mentoring senior staff and overseeing new systems to track children’s development. She orders new toys and equipment for us, analyses children’s data to advise on the organisation and structure of our rooms and acts as a shoulder to cry on when we have our own “bad days.”

Jo joined us many years ago as a temporary member of staff. She became an amazing Room Leader for the toddlers and has progressed to become an invaluable Deputy, a super-talented Manager and finally an inspiring┬áRegional Manager as our little company grew from one to three nurseries. Whilst working with us, Jo has studied for her degree and now holds the prestigious Early Years Professional Status. She knows us inside out and she has been instrumental in developing our policies and procedures. In short, she has been crucial in shaping Bambino’s future and as Jo prepares for the birth of her second child, I’d like her to know just how important she is to us all. And to apologise for the fuzzy edges of her job description.

Thank you, Jo!

A regional manager’s blurry edges